Outer space thread

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Vrede too
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Re: Outer space thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Sun Mar 18, 2018 11:25 am

So many wingnuts, so little time.

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billy.pilgrim
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Re: Outer space thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Sun Mar 18, 2018 1:02 pm

odds are running even money that trump will demand for a fly-over during his big parade to himself
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rstrong
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Re: Outer space thread

Unread post by rstrong » Sun Mar 18, 2018 4:04 pm

I've seen a lot of very bad reporting on the subject.

Musk says that he hopes to have a smaller-scale version of the BFR doing "up and down" flights (straight up for a few thousand feet then back down) by the end of 2019. And that may only mean the booster stage. But some otherwise credible papers have turned that into manned flights to Mars by 2019.

The article above sneers at NASA for all the stages/vehicles needed to get to the moon, while Musk plans to do it in just ONE. But strictly speaking, the BFR has a booster stage and the main spacecraft. And for beyond earth orbit it would be refueled by another BFR configured as a tanker, with it's own booster. So four stages/vehicles.

The BFR runs into the same problem the scrapped the Saturn V: Other than manned beyond-earth-orbit flights, there's nothing that needs a launcher that big. So the newer plan is to build the smaller-scale BFR, a replacement for the Falcon rockets that might pay for itself, before moving on to the big Mars ship.

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Vrede too
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Re: Outer space thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Thu Apr 19, 2018 7:16 pm

Senate Confirms Climate Change Denier To Lead NASA

... The final vote ― which was 50-49 along party lines ― came one day after the Senate narrowly advanced Bridenstine’s nomination, thanks to an about-face from Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and a key vote from Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.). Rubio, who in September told Politico that he worried about Bridenstine’s nomination “could be devastating for the space program,” said in a statement Wednesday that he decided to support the nominee in order to avoid “a gaping leadership void” at NASA....
Not Voting - McCain (R-AZ)
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billy.pilgrim
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Re: Outer space thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:10 am

Not that big of a deal that someone found 12 more moons orbiting Jupiter - the count was already 67, but one of the one time more normal size moon keeps getting smaller. This ball of rock and ice is now only one mile in diameter due to collisions from orbiting in the opposite direction as the other 78(+) moons.


https://youtu.be/aPB6AlNRRtQ
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Vrede too
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Re: Not so outer space thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:34 pm

US, Russian astronauts safe after emergency landing

A booster rocket failed less than two minutes after launching an American and a Russian toward the International Space Station on Thursday, forcing their emergency — but safe — landing on the steppes of Kazakhstan.

It was the latest in a recent series of failures for the troubled Russian space program, which is used by the U.S. to carry its astronauts to the station.

NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin were subjected to heavy gravitational forces as their capsule automatically jettisoned from the Soyuz booster rocket and fell back to Earth at a sharper-than-normal angle and landed about 20 kilometers (12 miles) east of the city of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan....
I didn't know that such events could be survivable.
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Leo Lyons
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Re: Not so outer space thread

Unread post by Leo Lyons » Thu Oct 11, 2018 10:09 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:34 pm
I didn't know that such events could be survivable.
Probably no longer using Chinese-made parachutes. Happy they're safe! :thumbup: :clap: :clap:
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