The Hiking Thread

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JTA
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by JTA » Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:26 am

Nice thanks. I opted for the ones that don't break down into three pieces. Supposedly, theyre less finicky and more stable. They collapse down to 24 inches in length versus 15 for the three piece foldable sticks. I figured this is still small enough to fit into luggage, or stick in my day back/backpack if I decide I don't want to use them for the rest of the hike. But looking back on hikes I've taken, I've almost always ended up using a walking stick for the duration anyway. I'll be trying them out this weekend on a backpacking trip. I'm sure my knees will be thanking me. Thanks for the advice!
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O Really
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:40 am

Won't take you long to love them.
The arm motion is basically the same as an exaggerated stride (similar to the power walkers but less comical), and you're using the downward motion of your right arm to support the propulsion of your left leg. So it makes you like a four-legged mover, sharing the propulsion/climb work on both arms as well as legs. Downhill is an even better assist, though, because you can plant the poles ahead of your step. Not to make a big deal out of something that is really easy, but getting the best use from the poles isn't that intuitive, and I've seen a lot of people on trails not using them properly.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:54 pm

I have used a stick (of sorts) since I started following my dad and grandfather around the farms. They were more for cows and the occasional snake than a walking aid, but still used as such. Papa, grandfather, used a simple hickory cane with a curved handle and Dad used the nearest tobacco stick when walking the farm. Papa used a new one for church and the stockyard.
I loved the feel of that handle, rubbed so many hundred of hours by his big calloused hands, more than any wood I have ever touched.
He helped me make one with a curved handle when I was eleven.

I don't do much hiking anymore, but still carry a 5 ft stick in the truck bed for walking in tall grass. The two pole with straps in a two piece design has to be far superior to the old single one piece cane for hiking, but a single cane can be a work of art. I know they make all wood one piece poles, but could think a composite or metal would be superior and yield to O Really on all things walking stick.
"Whenever injustices have been remedied, wars halted, women and Blacks and Native Americans given their due, it has been because “unimportant” people spoke up, organized, protested, and brought democracy alive." H. Zinn

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O Really
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm

billy.pilgrim wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:54 pm
...and yield to O Really on all things walking stick.
More than you think. My dad had issues through the years with arthritis and remnants of sports and war injuries and had several canes of different styles. Some quite artful. I gave away most and kept a couple. One is an authentic Irish Shillelagh, that looks badass, but you really couldn't carry it around without scaring people. The other, though, has a nice wide hook. I found a martial arts place that had cane fighting training and got reasonably proficient with it. The wide hook lets you grab your attacker's neck, leg, or arm, and it's solid oak so a whack on the side of the head, neck, or knees is quite effective. So when I was traveling more in airplanes, I took it along, hobbled up to the ticket counter for first boarding, and then had something to carry when I got off the train in Jersey City or wherever. Funny, you can take a piece in which you're trained to use as a weapon on a plane, but you can't take 3" knitting scissors.

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Vrede too
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:22 pm

O Really wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm
... Funny, you can take a piece in which you're trained to use as a weapon on a plane, but you can't take 3" knitting scissors.
Pretty hard to wield a cane effectively in a cramped plane. They didn't notice the retractable knife?

For years after 9/11 I thought it weird that wine came in glass bottles. Not sure if that's still the case, it's been awhile since I flew and even longer since I got any wine on a flight.
So many liberals, so little time. :P

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by billy.pilgrim » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:35 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:22 pm
O Really wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm
... Funny, you can take a piece in which you're trained to use as a weapon on a plane, but you can't take 3" knitting scissors.
Pretty hard to wield a cane effectively in a cramped plane. They didn't notice the retractable knife?

For years after 9/11 I thought it weird that wine came in glass bottles. Not sure if that's still the case, it's been awhile since I flew and even longer since I got any wine on a flight.
You must not watch much Jackie chan
"Whenever injustices have been remedied, wars halted, women and Blacks and Native Americans given their due, it has been because “unimportant” people spoke up, organized, protested, and brought democracy alive." H. Zinn

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:44 pm

Vrede too wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:22 pm
O Really wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm
... Funny, you can take a piece in which you're trained to use as a weapon on a plane, but you can't take 3" knitting scissors.
Pretty hard to wield a cane effectively in a cramped plane. They didn't notice the retractable knife?
.
A cane wouldn't be first choice for an offensive weapon on a plane, but neither would knitting scissors. Defensive, though, it's still got a lot of value. More thrusting and blocking, less swinging. The round side of the hook in your face would be pretty painful.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by rstrong » Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:47 pm

A friend's two babies and two toddlers are allowed on a plane.

When they start crying, it can actually be heard from the ground.

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Vrede too
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by Vrede too » Thu Oct 12, 2017 5:12 pm

rstrong wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:47 pm
A friend's two babies and two toddlers are allowed on a plane.

When they start crying, it can actually be heard from the ground.
That is all the other passengers, too.
So many liberals, so little time. :P

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k9nanny
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by k9nanny » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:03 am

Vrede too wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:22 pm
O Really wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:52 pm
... Funny, you can take a piece in which you're trained to use as a weapon on a plane, but you can't take 3" knitting scissors.
Pretty hard to wield a cane effectively in a cramped plane. They didn't notice the retractable knife?

For years after 9/11 I thought it weird that wine came in glass bottles. Not sure if that's still the case, it's been awhile since I flew and even longer since I got any wine on a flight.
First class has glassware, china, real cutlery, and full size glass bottles. We usually get bulkhead seats and have glimpses into the other world.

I have a folding cane. It's not elegant, but easy to carry and use when needed. I have used it defensively to suggest others give me space.
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JTA
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by JTA » Sun Oct 15, 2017 11:43 am

Trekking pole update: Worth it. I have zero ankle pain. Carrying a pack, my legs were barely even tired. They definitely make a huge difference and help you effortless haul ass up hill and down hill. Well worth it and I think I'll use them for now on.
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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:27 pm

Cool. Glad you're happy with them.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:55 pm

A couple of German tourists take a cheap backyard lake fun-type canoe down Hayes River 380 miles to Hudson Bay. Pretty much turned into "Deliverance" without the squealing pig part. Then ended up hiking 70 miles...

http://www.canoekayak.com/canoe/wrong-c ... ght-stuff/

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by rstrong » Fri Oct 27, 2017 10:02 pm

When we moved to The Pas in 1970, out back yard was swamp, then there was a back lane, then forest. Other than the road to the Grace Lake airport (which doubled as a runway) a few miles out, there was nothing for several hundred miles to Hudson's Bay. By the time we left a few years later, there was a whole subdivision between us and the forest, and more roads and highways further out.

The story is told of a float plane pilot flying out of Grace Lake who ran into engine trouble and made forced landing on a small lake. The lake wasn't quite long enough, and the plane ran into the scrub on the end of the lake.

The pilot wasn't able to get a message out, so he wasn't expecting to be found. He decided to walk out. It took him two weeks, with lots of swamps and mosquitos.

His plane *was* found, repaired, and flown out.

When the pilot emerged from the bush at Grace Lake after his epic journey, the first thing he saw was his plane.

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Re: The Hiking Thread

Unread post by O Really » Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:40 pm


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